US Dollar

 
US Fed Reserve


US Dollar, USD

USD or US Dollar is the official currency of the US. It’s also the most preferred currency in some other places outside of the US.

USD is the currency that has the highest number of transactions. It is the world’s most used money, either as paper money (the physical paper-like stuff) or on the internet.
Over 20 other countries use the US dollar largely either as official currency or unofficial currency Certain countries have currencies named “Dollar”. The one for US is often differentiated as “US Dollar”especially outside of US In financial documents either the sign or the code is likely used.

Sign

$

Code
USD
Denomination, notes
| uscurrency.gov |
US currency website
$1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, $100

US dollar

US dollar

US dollar

US dollar
US dollar
US dollar
US dollar
US dollar
US dollar
US dollar
US dollar
US dollar
US dollar
US dollar

Units
Cent, ยข 100 cents equal 1 dollar
Denominations no longer issued
| moneyfactory.gov|

Higher denominations above 100, namely: 500, 1000, 5000, 10,000 and 100,000 have been discontinued (by the issuing authorities) since 1969. The last time they were printed was 1945. Some still survive and remain legal tender. More details at link Bureau of Engraving and Printing, US Department of the Treasury

Exchange rate
The US dollar is not the most expensive currency. It is not the highest value currrency At times, top of the list high value currencies may ironically come from countries not considered super powers, eg Kuwait Have a look at some countries with currencies having value that is higher than that of US dollar (as at 2017):

1. EU ….Euro (EUR)
2. UK ….British Pound (GBP)
3. Switzerland ….Swiss Franc (CHF)
4. Kuwait ….Kuwaiti Dinar (KWD)
Exchange rates may change any time

Currency valuation
Some currencies may have a greater face value when compared to the US dollar, but not all are worth more than the dollar in the market Countries either peg the value of their currencies or allow it to flow freely – all things being equal the ‘free flow’ of currency value is often considered as most appropriate.

Pegging of value makes it difficult to ascertain the actual market value of the currency beyond what the central bank of such a country wants you to know.